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Flight Training - Training Curriculum

Private Pilot Certificate:

General Requirements:

  • 17 years of age (16 years to solo).
  • Read, cialis and write, speak, and understand the English language.
  • Obtain a Third Class Flight Physical.
  • Receive and log flight training from an Authorized Instructor.
  • Pass the FAA written test.
  • Meet aeronautical experience requirements.
  • Pass the FAA Practical Test (checkride).

 

FAA Requirements:

  • Minimum 40 hours total flight time.
  • 20 hours dual flight time.
  • 3 hours cross country.
  • 3 hours night instruction including 10 takeoffs & landings and a 150nm cross country.
  • 3 hours instrument training.
  • 3 hours flight test preparation.
  • 10 hours solo flight time.

Private Pilot Curriculum

Pre-solo:

  • Flight preparation procedures
  • Preflight inspections
  • Powerplant operations
  • Aircraft systems
  • Taxiing and runups.
  • Takeoffs and landings.
  • Normal and crosswind conditions.
  • Straight and level flight.
  • Shallow, medium and steep back turns in both directions.
  • Climbs and climbing turns.
  • Airport traffic pattern, entry and departure.
  • Collision and wake turbulence avoidance.
  • Descents with and without turns using high and low
  • drag configurations.
  • Flights from cruise to minimum controllable airspeed.
  • Emergency procedures and equipment malfunctions.
  • Ground reference maneuvers.
  • Approach to landings, idle and partial power.
  • Slips to landings.
  • Go-arounds: From final and in the flare in various
  • configurations and during turns.
  • Forced landings: Takeoff, initial climb, cruise,
  • descent and landing pattern.
  • Stall entries from various attitudes and power
  • combinations; partial stall through full stalls.
  • Stall awareness, knowledge in spin entry, spins, an
  • spin recovery techniques.
  • Written test: General knowledge.

First Solo:

  • Released for pattern solo.
  • Released for area solo.
  • 90 day endorsement due.

Post Solo:

  • Short and soft field takeoff, approach and landing
  • procedures, including crosswind takeoff and landings.
  • Takeoffs at best angle and best rate of climb.
  • Forward and side slips to landing.
  • Area solo and solo practice short and soft field

Cross-Country:

  • The use of aeronautical charts for VFR Navigation using pilotage and dead reckoning with the aid of magnetic compass.
  • Aircraft cross-country performance and procurement and analysis of weather reports and forecasts including recognition of critical weather situations and estimating visibility when in flight.
  • Cross-country emergency conditions.
  • Lost procedures.
  • Adverse weather conditions.
  • Simulated precautionary off-airport approaches and landings.

Traffic Pattern Procedures:

  • Normal area arrival and departure.
  • Collision avoidance.
  • Wake turbulence precaution.
  • Recognition of operational problems area in which the cross-country is to be flown.
  • Proper operation of the instruments and equipment installed in the aircraft to be flown.
  • Control and maneuvering solely by reference to flight instruments, including straight and level
  • flight, climbs, descents and turns, unusual attitude recovery, and the use of radio aids and radar
  • directives.
  • The use of radios for VFR navigation and two-way communications.
  • Night flying procedures including takeoffs, lands, go-arounds and VFR navigation.
  • First dual cross-country.

Flight Test Preparation:

  • Computer weather briefing (DUAT).
  • Endorsement for solo cross-country.
  • First solo cross-country.
  • Dual flight review - night flight.
  • Preparation for Private Pilot Flight Test.

 

 

Flying Is...

"Flying has torn apart the relationship of space and time: it uses our old clock but with new yardsticks". >Charles A. Lindbergh